"Hooked" on Special Olympics

noviembre 20, 2010

Jay Glicksman’s tenure as a Special Olympics volunteer and coach spans two decades.  He is also a loyal donor to the organization.  Through his involvement and support, Jay has transformed the lives of many athletes, yet he insists that it is his own life that has been enriched.

Glicksmann with Basketball team from China

At the World Games in Dublin, Jay was a volunteer and a local liaison for a Unified Basketball team from China. The team took home gold.

Jay Glicksman has traveled all over the world and lived in many U.S. cities since leaving Canada as a young man, but the one constant in his life has been Special Olympics.  He was first introduced to Special Olympics through volunteering.  “Right away I was hooked,” he says, describing what would become a 20-year-long passion.


Liftetime Committment

Jay’s dedication to causes he cares about was formed early when he helped run a high school environmental group.  That commitment to helping others deepened after he began to see the positive impact time and resources could have on an individual with intellectual disabilities.  Since that realization, he has supported many causes and, in the case of Special Olympics, Jay has touched the lives of hundreds of Special Olympics athletes, volunteering over the years in each community he has lived.

That transformation is profound.  “I see many differences: athletes who start as loners but end up with great friends; athletes who gain a sense of self and what they are capable of, athletes gaining confidence, maturity, and life skills.”

“There are so many good organizations doing good works but Special Olympics is unique.  My time with the organization has made me a better person and, in turn, we all make the world better for each other.”  He hopes that more supporters attend a training or a competition to see the difference Special Olympics makes with their support.  “My wish is for every person to have an experience with our athletes and have their lives enriched as mine has been.”

A Coach and a Fan

Jay recalls coaching a gymnast who was very shy and never jumped more than an inch from the springboard on the level 1 vault during practice, despite encouragement to jump higher. He concluded that athlete was too afraid of falling and getting hurt to jump higher. Then, at the competition something happened.  Jay saw the athlete jump a good two to three feet in the air and stuck his landing.  The athlete took home gold.  “When the event was over and I was congratulating him he still did not show any emotion -- but I was gushing!”

“I love sports, teaching, and coaching and being involved with Special Olympics keeps me smiling and having fun!” he adds.  That helps to explain the 16 different sports he’s certified to coach and his extensive Special Olympics games management expertise.  In fact, Jay has been such a part of Special Olympics that at one time he was even thought of as an “ex officio” staff member.

As for his steadfast financial support of Special Olympics, Jay says it’s obvious: it takes money to make any organization run well, even if it has committed volunteers.  He explains that "being heavily involved, I see where the money goes and that it is put to good use."

Your Donation Matters

Special Olympics transforms athletes’ lives through the joy of sport. Help us make a difference.

DONATE TODAY»

Volunteer Near You

Volunteering with Special Olympics is fun and very rewarding, for both the athlete and the volunteer!

LEARN MORE»

Follow Us

Ayúdenos a encontrar un atleta más

Donar »

Buscar eventos locales y obtener información sobre oportunidades para voluntarios en una de nuestras 220 oficinas en todo el mundo.

BUSCAR UNA LOCALIDAD PRÓXIMA »

Videos and Photos

Juegos unificadosLos deportes unificados revelan los puntos fuertes de cada miembro del equipo.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

DiferenteBarry Cairns explica qué representa ser un atleta con DI.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Atletas más sanosNuestra clínicas médicas gratuitas marcan una gran diferencia.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Esperanza en HaitíLeo y Gedeon juegan en campos precarios, ciudades de tiendas de campaña, donde pueden.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Lo que nos enseña el deporteNuestro trabajo que cambia vidas tiene como sustento la fuerza del deporte.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Muy, muy especialLa música ayuda a las Olimpiadas Especiales a tener un impacto mundial.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Noticias del mundoExcelentes fotos de eventos y personas de las Olimpiadas Especiales.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Colaboradores para el cambioLos colaboradores de las Olimpiadas Especiales son esenciales para hacer lo que hacemos.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deportes de veranoNuestros atletas corren, saltan, nadan y marcan en verano.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Poder del deporteLos deportes son un poderoso instrumento para cambiar la vida de nuestros atletas.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Qué hacemosDeportes, salud, educación, comunidad y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Quiénes somosSomos atletas, familiares, personalidades, voluntarios y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Inspiración de jóvenesEn India se está realizando un programa de Olimpiadas Especiales centrado en los jóvenes.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Hasta la cimaEl Kilimanjaro fue un campo de pruebas para un atleta de las Olimpiadas Especiales de Singapur.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deon NamisebEs un orador y un ejemplo a seguir. Pero no empezó así en Namibia.Más información »


Videos and Photos

Un mundo de oportunidadesLos médicos dijeron que Lani “nunca va a conseguir nada”. Más información »


Videos and Photos

Encontrar su vozDavid Egan siempre ha tenido grandes sueños. ¡Miren lo que ha logrado!Más información »


Special Olympics Blog

Health Needs Need Closer Examination

"You can't compete if your feet hurt, if your teeth hurt or if your ears ache."read more »

Posted on 2014-04-07 by Ryan

go to blog »


*

Special Olympics - Become a Fan