Project UNIFY Op-Ed

agosto 31, 2010

We fight to end the R-Word every day. We all know it’s how the world should be, but many times, those with no connection to our athletes have trouble understanding why it’s so critical.They read it in laws. They hear it used every day by their friends. They say it in their everyday conversation. Thanks to the passing of Rosa’s Law in the Senate earlier this month, the first of these three has been eliminated and we are one step closer to achieving the respect, dignity, and acceptance of those with intellectual disabilities.

A member of the Youth Activation Committee poses with a Special Olympics Athlete at the National Youth Activation Summit

Samantha Huffman (left) with Sara Wolff at the 2010 National Youth Activation Summit.

For all of us involved in the Spread the Word to End the Word Campaign, we know how difficult our fight is.  And it’s even harder when the government is using the language we’re fighting to end.  In school, we learn that being “politically correct” means using the language that our government uses.  So how can we be fighting for the elimination of the R-Word in everyday conversation if our government is still using it in the laws they pass?

In Soeren Palumbo’s famous speech, he states, “In an era of such political correctness, why is it that ‘retard’ is still okay?  Why do we allow it?”  To many, their answer would be that using the R-Word is politically correct, because our government uses it in their laws. 

While we know that this isn’t true, many others don’t.  They use these laws as an excuse to use the R-Word.  They use these laws as an excuse to hurt someone else.  But today, thanks to Rosa’s Law, the R-Word has been eliminated in health, education, and labor law.  Today, people can no longer use the law to hurt someone else.  Today, we are one step closer to reaching our goal of ending the use of the R-Word."

Samantha Huffman is a member of the Youth Activation Committee and a Sophomore at Hanover College in Indiana.


Your Donation Matters

Special Olympics transforms athletes’ lives through the joy of sport. Help us make a difference.

DONATE TODAY»

Volunteer Near You

Volunteering with Special Olympics is fun and very rewarding, for both the athlete and the volunteer!

LEARN MORE»

Follow Us

Ayúdenos a encontrar un atleta más

Donar »

Buscar eventos locales y obtener información sobre oportunidades para voluntarios en una de nuestras 220 oficinas en todo el mundo.

BUSCAR UNA LOCALIDAD PRÓXIMA »

Videos and Photos

Juegos unificadosLos deportes unificados revelan los puntos fuertes de cada miembro del equipo.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

DiferenteBarry Cairns explica qué representa ser un atleta con DI.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Atletas más sanosNuestra clínicas médicas gratuitas marcan una gran diferencia.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Esperanza en HaitíLeo y Gedeon juegan en campos precarios, ciudades de tiendas de campaña, donde pueden.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Lo que nos enseña el deporteNuestro trabajo que cambia vidas tiene como sustento la fuerza del deporte.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Muy, muy especialLa música ayuda a las Olimpiadas Especiales a tener un impacto mundial.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Noticias del mundoExcelentes fotos de eventos y personas de las Olimpiadas Especiales.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Colaboradores para el cambioLos colaboradores de las Olimpiadas Especiales son esenciales para hacer lo que hacemos.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deportes de veranoNuestros atletas corren, saltan, nadan y marcan en verano.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Poder del deporteLos deportes son un poderoso instrumento para cambiar la vida de nuestros atletas.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Qué hacemosDeportes, salud, educación, comunidad y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Quiénes somosSomos atletas, familiares, personalidades, voluntarios y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Inspiración de jóvenesEn India se está realizando un programa de Olimpiadas Especiales centrado en los jóvenes.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Hasta la cimaEl Kilimanjaro fue un campo de pruebas para un atleta de las Olimpiadas Especiales de Singapur.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deon NamisebEs un orador y un ejemplo a seguir. Pero no empezó así en Namibia.Más información »


Videos and Photos

Un mundo de oportunidadesLos médicos dijeron que Lani “nunca va a conseguir nada”. Más información »


Videos and Photos

Encontrar su vozDavid Egan siempre ha tenido grandes sueños. ¡Miren lo que ha logrado!Más información »


Special Olympics Blog

Health Needs Need Closer Examination

"You can't compete if your feet hurt, if your teeth hurt or if your ears ache."read more »

Posted on 2014-04-07 by Ryan

go to blog »


*

Special Olympics - Become a Fan