Triage Pilot Examines New Way to Conduct Healthy Athletes

abril 01, 2010

By Stephanie Savarese

When athletes come to Healthy Athletes, they often first go to the discipline venue that is most convenient, that their friends are visiting, or offers the most interesting give-away item.

Triage_300x200

Paulette Seymour-Route (right), Dean of the University of Massachusetts Medical School's Graduate School of Nursing, helps perform screening measures during the pilot study.

Some athletes may never reach the discipline that offers the screening they need most. At an event held March 13 in Massachusetts, however, 16 Special Olympics athletes participated in a Health Triage Pilot Study designed to offer an initial evaluation and direct them to the most needed venues.

At this first-ever triage test event, athletes were taken through a pre-screen for all seven Healthy Athletes disciplines and asked a series of questions about health issues. The data gathered was used to direct the athletes to the specific disciplines that address their health issues. Athletes were also given a report card to take home that noted which areas of follow-up were needed.

The study was the combined effort of Special Olympics International (SOI), North America (SONA) and Massachusetts (SOMA), and volunteers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Graduate School of Nursing. Paulette Seymour-Route, Dean of School and Health Promotion Clinical Director, recruited many faculty and students to perform the screening measures. The experience was an effective way to combine the clinical and research interests of the nurses with the spirit of Special Olympics, according to Dean Seymour-Route.

“The ability to work with these athletes was a wonderful experience,” she said. “The students and faculty who participated commented that the engaging personalities and competitive spirit of the athletes was eye-opening.”

The Graduate School of Nursing’s involvement in SOMA is a result of an official affiliation between SOMA and the University of Massachusetts’ Medical School that began in the fall of 2008. Aside from their support of this pilot, the affiliation has brought hundreds of medical and nursing students into Special Olympics programs and it had encouraged UMASS to be steadfast in their effort to expose medical and nursing students to the population with disabilities in order to reduce their health disparities.

Massachusetts was proud to host the Health Triage Pilot, and all athletes who participated had a great day and enjoyed the attention from the medical professionals. Pilot studies like these serve as proof that Special Olympics is continuously fighting to improve the health of the individuals they serve.

Additional Triage Pilot events are planned by Special Olympics in 2010. Data from these pilots will be used to determine the reliability of the pre-screening and athlete self-assessment questionnaire, logistical considerations, and athlete and coach experience.

Stephanie Savarese is the Healthy Athletes Program Coordinator for Special Olympics Massachusetts. Her blog for SOMA on Health can be found here: http://specialolympicsma.wordpress.com/


Your Donation Matters

Special Olympics transforms athletes’ lives through the joy of sport. Help us make a difference.

DONATE TODAY»

Volunteer Near You

Volunteering with Special Olympics is fun and very rewarding, for both the athlete and the volunteer!

LEARN MORE»

Follow Us

Ayúdenos a encontrar un atleta más

Donar »

Buscar eventos locales y obtener información sobre oportunidades para voluntarios en una de nuestras 220 oficinas en todo el mundo.

BUSCAR UNA LOCALIDAD PRÓXIMA »

Videos and Photos

Juegos unificadosLos deportes unificados revelan los puntos fuertes de cada miembro del equipo.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

DiferenteBarry Cairns explica qué representa ser un atleta con DI.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Atletas más sanosNuestra clínicas médicas gratuitas marcan una gran diferencia.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Esperanza en HaitíLeo y Gedeon juegan en campos precarios, ciudades de tiendas de campaña, donde pueden.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Lo que nos enseña el deporteNuestro trabajo que cambia vidas tiene como sustento la fuerza del deporte.Ver vídeo: »


Videos and Photos

Muy, muy especialLa música ayuda a las Olimpiadas Especiales a tener un impacto mundial.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Noticias del mundoExcelentes fotos de eventos y personas de las Olimpiadas Especiales.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Colaboradores para el cambioLos colaboradores de las Olimpiadas Especiales son esenciales para hacer lo que hacemos.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deportes de veranoNuestros atletas corren, saltan, nadan y marcan en verano.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Poder del deporteLos deportes son un poderoso instrumento para cambiar la vida de nuestros atletas.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Qué hacemosDeportes, salud, educación, comunidad y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Quiénes somosSomos atletas, familiares, personalidades, voluntarios y más.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Inspiración de jóvenesEn India se está realizando un programa de Olimpiadas Especiales centrado en los jóvenes.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Hasta la cimaEl Kilimanjaro fue un campo de pruebas para un atleta de las Olimpiadas Especiales de Singapur.Vea la presentación »


Videos and Photos

Deon NamisebEs un orador y un ejemplo a seguir. Pero no empezó así en Namibia.Más información »


Videos and Photos

Un mundo de oportunidadesLos médicos dijeron que Lani “nunca va a conseguir nada”. Más información »


Videos and Photos

Encontrar su vozDavid Egan siempre ha tenido grandes sueños. ¡Miren lo que ha logrado!Más información »


Special Olympics Blog

Health Needs Need Closer Examination

"You can't compete if your feet hurt, if your teeth hurt or if your ears ache."read more »

Posted on 2014-04-07 by Ryan

go to blog »


*

Special Olympics - Become a Fan