September 20, 2017 | North America: Michigan

SOMI athlete runs Mackinac Bridge with LETR members

By Aaron Mills

From Left to Right: Officer Jeremy Walleman of the Sterling Heights Police Department, Special Olympics Michigan athlete Julian Borst of Kalamazoo, Sergeant Mark Bunting of the Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility in Ionia and Trooper Jim Yeager of the Michigan State Police (Lakeview Post)

Law Enforcement members spent the week of September 11 running across the state as part of a 750-mile relay known as "Central Route", raising money and awareness for the athletes of Special Olympics Michigan. On Wednesday, September 13, one of those athletes, 20-year-old Julian Borst from KalamazooView Story Law Enforcement members spent the week of September 11 running across the state as part of a 750-mile relay known as "Central Route", raising money and awareness for the athletes of Special Olympics Michigan. On Wednesday, September 13, one of those athletes, 20-year-old Julian Borst from Kalamazoo joined Officer Jeremy Walleman of the Sterling Heights Police Department, Trooper Jim Yeager of the Michigan State Police (Lakeview Post), and Sergeant Mark Bunting of the Bellamy Creek Correctional Facility in Ionia in taking the relay across the Mackinac Bridge from St. Ignace to the lower peninsula. The relay ended on Belle Isle near Detroit on Friday, September 15. Borst is an avid runner, training five to 11 miles per day. He's also one of 56 Special Olympics athletes who will represent Michigan at the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games in Seattle next July.

About Aaron Mills: Aaron Mills is the Sr. Marketing and Communications Director for Special Olympics Michigan.
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August 11, 2017 | North America: Michigan

Dalvin Keller awarded honorary ESPY

By Mitchell Hatty

Dalvin Keller, a Special Olympics Michigan athlete from Flint, and seven other Special Olympics athletes were on stage at the 25th annual ESPY Awards show on July 12 in Los Angeles.View Story The ESPY Awards are the pinnacle of sports accomplishment and recognition. Dalvin Keller, a Special Olympics Michigan athlete from Flint, and seven other Special Olympics athletes were on stage at the 25th annual ESPY Awards show on July 12 in Los Angeles, assisting in the acceptance of the Arthur Ashe Courage Award in honor of the late Eunice Kennedy Shriver, the founder of Special Olympics."It was pretty fun, I had a good time," Dalvin said. "Celebrities, movie stars, all stars; I met them all."Dalvin also received his own honorary ESPY for his courage and commitment through sports as his team won gold in the 2015 Special Olympics World Games in volleyball. Dalvin had a hard time fitting in throughout his childhood. Getting picked on while growing up and going through hard struggles; he never expected something like this to happen from playing sports."It felt good to me, at least I accomplished something," Dalvin said. The Arthur Ashe Courage Award is given to those whose actions go above and beyond sports to the benefit of others. Eunice Kennedy Shriver dedicated her life to finding equality through sport for all people. The award was accepted by her son and Special Olympics Chairman Timothy Shriver.Dalvin was on stage with Michelle Obama during this award acceptance; he met many celebrities and some of his favorite sports icons.

About Mitchell Hatty: Mitchell Hatty is a Marketing and Communications intern with Special Olympics Michigan.
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August 11, 2017 | North America: Michigan

Retired teacher in Michigan has seen the benefits of Special Olympics firsthand

By Trevor Metz

Special Olympics Michigan volleyball coach Connie Shelton.

Volunteers and coaches for Special Olympics Michigan are the oil in the machine for making the dream work.View Story Teamwork makes the dream work. Volunteers and coaches for Special Olympics Michigan are the oil in the machine for making the dream work. Connie Shelton, a volleyball coach with Area 20 (Washtenaw County), has been involved with Special Olympics Michigan for more than 30 years. Over time, Connie has seen the State Summer Games blossom into the spectacle it is today."The whole event has become larger, events are coordinated well with lots of variety," said Connie.The Ypsilanti resident has seen firsthand how the State Summer Games have a way to change a person's outlook on life.The coach sees her athletes gain life skills that follow them past the fun-filled weekend. Leaving an impression on them that they are capable of doing anything they put their mind to.Connie, a retired schoolteacher at Ypsilanti Area Public Schools, implemented lessons learned from Special Olympics Michigan into her curriculum. This helps make students with intellectual disabilities feel more included in the classroom.

About Trevor Metz: Trevor Metz is a Marketing and Communications intern with Special Olympics Michigan.
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