Special Olympics Chief Health Officer on the challenges coronavirus poses for people with disabilities

Over the years, Special Olympics has provided over 2 million free health screenings (in the areas of vision, hearing, dental, etc.) in over 135 countries and trained nearly 280,000 health care professionals on the topic of people with ID.
Over the years, Special Olympics has provided over 2 million free health screenings (in the areas of vision, hearing, dental, etc.) in over 135 countries and trained nearly 280,000 health care professionals on the topic of people with ID.

“At Special Olympics, when we can’t be in our competitions and our events, we still are everyday connecting with our athletes to make sure they aren’t socially isolated,” said Dr. Alicia Bazzano, Chief Health Officer for Special Olympics during an interview with MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports.

Dr. Bazzano explained that Special Olympics provides resources, such as fitness training and self-care skills to athletes in order to help them cope and stay healthy with the current COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Bazzano also spoke about the work that Special Olympics does with Young Athletes – under the age of seven – to give them activities to stay active and engaged at home, while parks and libraries are closed.

Watch the full interview below or click here:

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