Our Impact

CDC and Special Olympics Partnership: Inclusive Health: Physical Fitness

An athlete practices their basketball skills.
CDC and Special Olympics have joined forces to increase the number of people with intellectual disabilities who participate in year-round wellness programming.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) support work that improves the overall health and quality of life for people living with disabilities, including those with intellectual disabilities. The CDC currently supports a range of Special Olympics Health initiatives. These include the Healthy Athletes program that facilitates health screenings, health promotion and education; an expansion of access to follow-up care and wellness programming; partnerships with medical schools and health professionals to integrate appropriate training and education for the next generation of health professionals; and development of the largest data set on people with intellectual disabilities in the country—to better analyze the problem of health inequality and how best to address it. The partnership also elevates inclusive health to the national stage, targeting wellness, fitness, professional associations, medical schools, public health organizations, funders, and others to become champions of inclusive health.

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